What is the Strongest Wood?

Wood is a strong and durable building material but wood is not created equal. There are soft woods and there are hard woods and then there are very hard very strong woods. When selecting a type of wood for your next project it is important to also consider the strength and durability of your material. To give you a good idea, here are ten of the hardest woods in the world.

The strongest woods in the world

The following are the strongest wood species with the Australian Buloke as the overall winner. These are based on the Janka hardness rating system which will be discussed later.

Australian Buloke

The Australian Buloke is an ironwood tree that is native to Australia. This is known as the hardest wood in the world with a Janka hardness of 5,060 lbf. The Buloke comes from a species of tree that grows across Eastern and Southern Australia. This type of wood is commercially available therefore you can find furniture made from this tree from local sellers.

Schinopsis brasiliensis

The Schinopsis brasiliensis is a flowering plant that belongs to the cashew family; the schinopsis brasiliensis comes from Brazil and is known to be extremely tough with 4,800 lbf. It’snot surprising that this wood is used in the construction industry.

Schinopsis balansae

The Schinopsis balansae is a hardwood tree and is known as one of the most popular trees in the forests of Argentina and Paraguay. This strong tree grows to a whopping 24 meters in height and has 4,570 lbf. Janka hardness which means it is super strong. This tree is commonly used in constructing homes and buildings.

Lignum vitae

Lignum vitae is a hardwood that came from trees with genus Guaiacum. This tree is indigenous to the Caribbean and the northern coast of South America. Because of its strength, this wood has been used for building homes and constructing furniture. The Lignum vitae is a combination of strength, density, and toughness with a Janka hardness of 4,500 lbf.

Piptadenia Macrocarpa

The Piptadenia macrocarpa has a Janka hardness rating of 3,840 lbf., therefore it is known as one of the strongest. It is used mainly for residential and construction projects. This resilient tree is from Argentina, Bolivia, and Peru.

Snakewood

Another tough contender is snakewood with a Janka rating of 3,800 lbf. But unlike the previous tree species, snakewood is an exotic hardwood prized for its highly figured grain structure. This wood comes from South America and is used in the construction business where there is a need for strong and very resilient wood.

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Brazilian Ebony

The Brazilian ebony is a dense, heavy wood that comes from Paraguay, Argentina, and Brazil. This amazing natural wood has a Janka rating of 3,692. The Brazilian ebony is perfect for the construction of decking and planking. Aside from being durable, it is also shock-resistant.

This is very lovely, strong and cost-effective.

Brazilian Walnut

Another Central and South America strong wood is the Brazilian walnut. This tree has varying tree grain that varies from straight to irregular or interlocked. The hardness rating of this wood is 3,684 lbf. Therefore it has been used to build different projects whether you are indoors or outdoors.

African Pearwood

This is species of tree is naturally found in Angola, Cameroon, the Republic of Congo, Gabon, and Nigeria. You will be able to find this strong wood in tropical moist lowland forests;the wood has a Janka hardness rating of 3,680 lbf.

Janka Rating System

It’s natural to have doubts about the hardness of wood which is why there’s the Janka Rating System, this measures the relative hardness of woods. Considered the hardest commercially available hardwood is hickory. There are hundreds of varieties of hardwood in North America. Hardness is an important factor to consider and this varies for different species. This is why the Janka Scale of Hardness is used as the best tool to find out the hardness or strength of wood species. The Janka Scale of Hardness can help you identify appropriate choices for construction or building.

Conclusion

The strongest commercially available wood is the Australian Buloke. This wood is so strong it has been used in the construction and furniture manufacture industry for many years. It has a Janka hardness rating of 5060 lbf.

  • December 29, 2018
  • DIY