How Many Ricks in a Cord of Wood?

Have you ever purchased wood before?

Then you may have heard about the different terms used by most firewood dealers in the yard. Don’t be caught not knowing what a cord or a rick is!

You must learn about these terms so you can confidently purchase firewood anywhere. This guide will be able to help you how.

How many ricks in a cord of firewood?

A rick is simply a description of the way a cord is stacked. A cord is 4 x 4 x 8 feet, or 128 cubic feet. A standard cord is arranged in a 4×8-foot stack or a rick.

Therefore, a rick also refers to a stack which can be more than just firewood. It could be hay or leaves that have been left out to dry.

Buying firewood can be a difficult experience especially for inexperienced consumers. Most sales are done in an informal manner in a lumber yard. There are even firewood suppliers that won’t use the standard unit of measurement in their sales.

Consider that the firewood you are buying is dry. It should also be the best wood species for burning. And of course, it must also be the best quantity for the price.

Buy only seasoned wood

After being felled, a tree is harvested and cut. During this time, the tree is still green and it still contains a large amount of water. Green wood is a poor fuel to make fires for fireplaces, bonfires, wood burning stoves, and heaters. The wood must be dried or seasoned before you can use this for burning.

However, wood species vary in the amount of water they contain when wood is still green and slowly when these dry out. Different types of wood season different times as well. Ash wood dries easily and may only need a short seasoning time. Oak dries very slowly, therefore, this may require very long seasoning time.

Another thing to consider is that wood will dry quicker if it is cut to the final length ASAP after the tree was felled. Splitting will also improve drying. A large log will dry very slowly and it can be very difficult to see if it has been seasoned. The only way to check if a log is dry is through its ends but still, it does not conclude that the entire piece has been completely seasoned.

Actually, any wood species will make a good fire once the wood has been completely dried. When you check a lumber yard, the most preferred type of wood is heavier woods such as oak and hickory. This type of wood has more fuel value per piece hence will be worth your purchase. On the other hand, lighter woods can be mixed with heavier wood and may also be processed to make kindling when starting fires.

Other units of measure for firewood

Aside from cord and rick, you may also find other terminologies that refer to buying firewood. You may also find racks, truckloads, face cords, bush cords, and other jargons. If you encounter these terms, don’t be afraid to ask for the official unit of measure which is a cord.

A cord is a stacked pile that measures 4 feet high by 4 feet deep by 8 feet wide or 128 cubic feet. When wood is cut into 16" lengths, a cord is already called a bush cord and will contain three rows. Each of the rows is a face cord or rick. If stacked neatly on a full-size pickup truck this will amount to about ½ of a cord or 64 cubic feet.

Conclusion

No doubt that wood is an excellent, environmentally-friendly fuel that you can use to warm your home and cook your food. But buying firewood could be a challenge especially if you are new and inexperienced. With the many terminologies used in the sale of wood, you can easily become confused. Therefore, learning what a rick and cord are can be useful in getting the best value out of your money when you purchase firewood.

  • January 5, 2019
  • DIY
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